Product Detail 50 grams of the finest quality Psyllium Husks Description Psyllium Husks are mainly used as a dietary fiber which is not absorbed by the small intestine. The purely mechanical action of psyllium mucilage absorbs excess water while stimulating normal bowel elimination. Although its main use has been as a laxative it is more

psyllium-husks-750x650-1.jpg
Product Detail 50 grams of the finest quality Psyllium Husks Description Psyllium Husks are mainly used as a dietary fiber which is not absorbed by the small intestine. The purely mechanical action of psyllium mucilage absorbs excess water while stimulating normal bowel elimination. Although its main use has been as a laxative it is more appropriately termed a true dietary fiber and as such can help reduce the symptoms of both constipation and mild diarrhea. Psyllium is produced mainly for its mucilage content which is highest in P. ovata. The term mucilage describes a group of clear colorless gelling agents derived from plants. The mucilage obtained from psyllium comes from the seed coat. Mucilage is obtained by mechanical milling/grinding of the outer layer of the seed. Mucilage yield amounts to about 25% (by weight) of the total seed yield. Plantago-seed mucilage is often referred to as husk or psyllium husk. The milled seed mucilage is a white fibrous material that is hydrophilic meaning that its molecular structure causes it to attract and bind to water. Upon absorbing water the clear colorless mucilaginous gel that forms increases in volume by tenfold or more. Culinary Use The husks are used whole in their natural state or dried and chopped or powdered for easier consumption. In either of these forms one takes them by mixing them with water or another fluid. They can also be added to salads. Sometimes they are combined with clay as a detoxification drink. Psyllium is used as a thickener in ice cream and frozen desserts. Medicinal Use Psyllium Husks are used to relieve constipation irritable bowel syndrome diverticular disease and diarrhea. They are also used as a regular dietary supplement to improve and maintain regular GI transit. The inert bulk of the husks helps provide a constant volume of solid material irrespective of other aspects of the diet or any disease condition of the gut. Some recent research is also showing them to be promising in lowering cholesterol and controlling diabetes. Over-the-counter laxatives and fiber supplements such as Metamucil Colon Cleanse Serutan Fybogel Bonvit and Effersyllium have psyllium husks as their main ingredient. They may be combined with other ingredients (e.g. Blackstrap molasses is sometimes used with psyllium seed husks for its high mineral and vitamin content as well as being an excellent carrier). A typical dose is one to three teaspoons per glass of water. Psyllium seeds can be used for the same purpose at a lower cost. The jelly-like mucilage produced when psyllium is soaked in water has the ability to absorb toxins within the large bowel. Thus it helps to remove toxins from the body and can be used to reduce auto-toxicity. The oil in the seed embryo contains 50% linoleic acid and has been used as a preventative of atherosclerosis. It is also effective in reducing cholesterol levels in the blood. Possible adverse reactions include allergic reactions such as anaphylaxis especially among those who have had regular exposure to psyllium dust. Gastrointestinal tract obstruction may occur especially for those with prior bowel surgeries or anatomic abnormalities or if taken with inadequate amounts of water. sources https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psyllium https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psyllium_seed_husks https://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Plantago+ovata

Add Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *