Product Detail 20 grams of the finest quality dried Parsley Leaves Description Parsley (Petroselinum crispum) is a bright green biennial herb often used as spice. It is common in Middle Eastern European and American cooking. Parsley is used for its leaf in much the same way as coriander (which is also known as Chinese parsley

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Product Detail 20 grams of the finest quality dried Parsley Leaves Description Parsley (Petroselinum crispum) is a bright green biennial herb often used as spice. It is common in Middle Eastern European and American cooking. Parsley is used for its leaf in much the same way as coriander (which is also known as Chinese parsley or cilantro) although parsley has a milder flavor. Two forms of parsley are used as herbs: curly leaf and Italian or flat leaf parsley (P. neapolitanum). Curly leaf parsley is often used as a garnish. One of the compounds of the essential oil is apiol. Culinary Use In Central and Eastern Europe and in West Asia many dishes are served with fresh green chopped parsley sprinkled on top. Green parsley is often used as a garnish. The fresh flavor of the green parsley goes extremely well with potato dishes (french fries boiled buttered potatoes or mashed potato) with rice dishes (risotto or pilaf) with fish fried chicken lamb or goose steaks meat or vegetable stews (like Beef Bourguignon Goulash or Chicken paprikash). In Southern and Central Europe parsley is part of bouquet garni a bundle of fresh herbs used to flavor stocks soups and sauces. Freshly chopped green parsley is used as a topping for soups like chicken soup green salads or salads like Salade Olivier on open sandwiches with cold cuts or pâtés. Parsley is a key ingredient in several West Asian salads e.g. tabbouleh (the national dish of Lebanon). Persillade is mixture of chopped garlic and chopped parsley in the French cuisine. Gremolata is a traditional accompaniment to the Italian veal stew Ossobuco alla milanese a mixture of parsley garlic and lemon zest. In addition the consumption of parsley is thought to contribute to sweet smelling breath. Medicinal Use Parsley is a commonly grown culinary and medicinal herb that is often used as a domestic medicine. The fresh leaves are highly nutritious and can be considered a natural vitamin and mineral supplement in their own right. The plants prime use is as a diuretic where it is effective in ridding the body of stones and in treating jaundice dropsy cystitis etc. It is also a good detoxifier helping the body to get rid of toxins via the urine and therefore helping in the treatment of a wide range of diseases such as rheumatism. The seed is a safe herb at normal doses but in excess it can have toxic effects. All parts of the plant can be used medicinally the root is the part most often used though the seeds have a stronger action. Parsley is antidandruff antispasmodic aperient carminative digestive diuretic emmenagogue expectorant galactofuge kidney stomachic and tonic. An infusion of the roots and seeds is taken after childbirth to promote lactation and help contract the uterus. Parsley is also a mild laxative and is useful for treating anaemia and convalescents. Caution is advised on the internal use of this herb especially in the form of the essential oil. A poultice of the leaves has been applied externally to soothe bites and stings it is also said to be of value in treating tumours of a cancerous nature. It has been used to treat eye infections whilst a wad of cotton soaked in the juice will relieve toothache or earache. It is also said to prevent hair loss and to make freckles disappear. Parsley should not be consumed as a drug or supplement by pregnant women as it could lead to uterine stimulation and preterm labor or miscarriage. Excessive doses can cause liver and kidney damage nerve inflammation and gastro-intestinal haemorrhage. If the leaves are kept close to the breasts of a nursing mother for a few days the milk flow will cease. sources https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parsley https://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Petroselinum+crispum

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